EDS 113 Module 1: Exams make the (students’) world go round

The cold hard truth is sometimes hard to swallow, especially this one
for teachers who actually believe in true assessments: exams are a
student’s world. We are judged by it, therefore we will kill for it, we
will die for it. Missing an exam is unheard of in UP, and I guess in
many othe colleges. And yet, we don’t understand why it defines us.

I remember a first semester season in UPLB at the PhySci building where
I found myself walking to take one of those popular 7-9pm departmental
exams. I was walking casually towards the second floor at the ICS (yes,
I was once a computer science major). I peeked thru the glass square of
the exam room door and I saw it filled with students; initial reaction
was puzzled then, shocked.

My instructor exited the door and greeted me, saying “O, late ka, Ms
Banal.” I didn’t even know he knew me.

I looked at my watch and it said 6:50pm and I clearly wasn’t late. My
feelings slowly turning into panic as I began to ask the people who are
getting out one by one that this is the finals I was going to take at
7pm, which turns out was moved to 5pm. My worst nightmare was realized.

Not that because I was burning oil night and day studying for this
exam, I generally don’t review for tests back in the day, but the
thought of mising an important event in a student’s life probably means
I will fail the course. All invested work all semester would have been
wasted, only because I missed the rescheduling announcement on this
one.

Let us imagine for a second the bar exam, the medical board exams, the LET. Learners are defined by exams, and truth be told, lives are dependent on it. Students toil the hardest on exams in the hopes of being rated highly, but isn’t that a form of deceit? An intentional, deliberate attempt to make your professor think you knew more than you actually do, all because you were able to cram meaningless terms in one, or some, all nighter? If that is the case then there is nothing genuine about this type of assessment.

And that is why I didn’t even bother pulling the pleas on the teacher and request another shot on the exam because I didn’t think I deserved to be judged based on a two-hour quiz. I reenrolled, and “killed it”, so to speak.

I now wonder if my course instructor tried to improve his teaching, or the program after finding the assessment results of my classmates.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s